College Professors and Twitter.

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This is a bad sign.Actually... It's 5,330 At Last Count.

I have over 5,300 followers on Twitter.

Why?  I assume they have bad taste and not enough hobbies, but that’s another blog.

Most people seem to follow because occassionally I will comment on education topics (mostly I provide updates on Buddy the Dog, my new TV show, and express my anger that our next President may be named Newt).

My followers include college students, teachers, principals, assistant principals, superintendents, and parents.

I just about forgot… nearly 73% of my Twitter followers are hardcore gangbangers who are doing time in federal prison (and I would like to add… for crimes they didn’t commit)

What bothers me about this situation isn’t the drug trafficking across state lines, but the fact that I have exactly 0 Twitter followers who are College Education Professors.

Yes, I said 0 (typed… whatever).

Wouldn’t you think someone… somewhere…  would be a college professor with time on their hands who might want to follow other educators on Twitter?

It worries me that the people teaching the next generation of teachers and administrators may not be using technology at the same rate as other educators.

And more importantly, students.

Since there is always room for more followers, you can find me @principalspage.

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20 Responses to “College Professors and Twitter.”


  1. Spike C. Cook
    on Jan 29th, 2012
    @ 8:30 pm

    Interesting take. You are right. We need to get more higher ed on twitter.


  2. Lucia Jenkins
    on Jan 29th, 2012
    @ 8:43 pm

    As an assistant principal who just finished a second master’s degree at a local university, i can assure you that the college professors are NOT in touch with what is going on in education in public schools and that teacher/administrator’s education programs are not very useful. But I bet most of you already knew that.


  3. Kellylovesfrogs
    on Jan 29th, 2012
    @ 9:00 pm

    Hey Mike, I am following your blog as a requirement for a class I am taking at Texas Christian University. I haven’t had any professors using Twitter in grad school, but some do use it for undergrads. Of course, it may not be the profs posting, but their TAs.


  4. Kellylovesfrogs
    on Jan 29th, 2012
    @ 9:13 pm

    I did want to clarify I am NOT being forced to read this blog. Nor am I being punished. I am not a convicted felon either:). I am an inner city 8th grade science teacher which might make insane, but I love it!


  5. Debbie W
    on Jan 30th, 2012
    @ 6:33 am

    I’m thinking of applying for an adjunct position at our local community college. . . . just so you’ll have at least one follower from higher ed.


  6. Ben K.
    on Jan 30th, 2012
    @ 6:33 am

    First!

    I co-teach a course called Technology in the Classroom at Saint Mary’s University-Twin Cities (Minneapolis, MN). We spend about 2 hours in class covering how to use Twitter for education. We do a very cool paper Twitter activity (ala @ktenkely, she’s awesome). Then we have an assignment to create an account, find five people to follow, and make a list of people in the class to follow.

    As a teacher, I think Twitter is valuable both professionally and for my classroom. I’v learned so much to use in my classroom and shared equally. I also post classroom information on Twitter (homework and what not).

    @learnteachtech, @mrknaus.

    Good day sir! Give buddy a scratch behind the ears!

    Michael Smith Reply:

    @Ben K., Buddy always loves a shout-out.

    And an ear scratch.


  7. Kate Fail
    on Jan 30th, 2012
    @ 2:04 pm

    Mr Smith,
    I am a student at the University of South Alabama and I am majoring in Elementary Education. I am currently enrolled in EDM 310. In this class, we learn about the use of technology in the classroom. We are required by our professor, Dr. John Strange, to create a Twitter account and follow many different educators all over the country and world. I had never had a Twitter account until now and am seeing how useful it is. I have learned a lot already and enjoy seeing what other educators are posting. I agree with you that many professors that teach education need to have a Twitter account. I know my professor does and talks about the benefits of it often. I wish more of my education professors had one. Thanks for the post and I look forward to exploring more of your blog and website! I am also now following you on Twitter.


  8. Kate Fail
    on Jan 30th, 2012
    @ 2:12 pm

    Hello again! I also wanted to send you a link to our class blog so you can see some of the things we are doing in our class. Each month we are assigned a different educator and we comment on their blogs twice then summarize your blog post and our responses and post them to our blog as an assignment. edm310.blogspot.com


  9. Amy
    on Jan 30th, 2012
    @ 8:29 pm

    Very interesting. Will you please explain something to me? I do not have unlimited texting, so actually following anyone on Twitter seems like it will not work…. How do you find the time to read all of the texts? I believe it is possible to receive the texts via email… but then I have to read all of them! Any ideas? I teach at a community college and am getting my MAT in TESOL. Thank you.


  10. Patricia Dickenson
    on Jan 31st, 2012
    @ 1:09 am

    Hello,

    I am writing to inform you that I am a college professor and I do use twitter. I have several colleagues who also use twitter. I also follow former students, coaches, teachers, and principals so that I can stay up to date with what is going on in the classroom. I also visit classrooms regularly and work with student teachers and site supervisors.

    I will follow you and now you can follow me: @doctorofed


  11. Christine
    on Jan 31st, 2012
    @ 12:36 pm

    I’m all about technology. I love it! The website I gave above is actually my school’s. I have made one for my class, grades 4,5,6, but sadly, cannot share because of privacy concerns among parents. (Which, I somewhat agree with.) The students are actually in charge of updating it weekly. But, Twitter…it’s blocked. My school is so savvy it blocks many sites which I feel are educational and productive. So, I will not be making a Twitter account anytime soon.


  12. Kate Fail
    on Jan 31st, 2012
    @ 1:20 pm

    Thanks for your reply! South Alabama is located in Mobile, AL.

    Michael Smith Reply:

    @Kate Fail, Love South Alabama!

    Go Jags!


  13. Christi
    on Jan 31st, 2012
    @ 7:11 pm

    TA’s for Twitter!! You should start a campaign. Maybe the professors would want to play too once they see it in action.

    I tagged you on my blog today as I blogger I’ve been admiring for a while now. =)

    Christi
    http://msfultz.blogspot.com/


  14. Alicia Manuel Kessler
    on Feb 1st, 2012
    @ 10:52 pm

    “She turned me into a Newt!”

    “A Newt??”

    “I got better….”

    The Holy Grail. Maybe the best movie ever.

    Michael Smith Reply:

    @Alicia Manuel Kessler, Maybe the best?

    Maybe?

    I think you mean… “Simply the Best. Ever.”


  15. Marla McGhee
    on Feb 6th, 2012
    @ 8:14 am

    I’m an educational leadership university professor and I follow plenty of folks on twitter for professional purposes…I just don’t follow you. So sorry…


  16. Classof1
    on Feb 9th, 2012
    @ 11:03 pm

    I have to agree with you there with the trend of educators not keeping up with technology, especially with corporate giants such as Apple getting into this education industry with their iBooks. So it’s either go with the flow, or be left behind.


  17. Bradley
    on May 15th, 2012
    @ 9:55 am

    It is important for all levels of education to try and get onto twitter. This means students can talk to their professors and vice versa.

    Unfortunately most don’t bother using this medium of communication.

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